1. What are your best qualities?

I am a true friend, I am a good listener and I am a hard worker. 

2. What are your worst qualities?

I can be critical of myself and of others. I am  a hard worker - I am not sure I am a “workaholic” but I enjoy working. I enjoy being busy and being productive - maybe to a fault.  I have high expectations of others. 

3. What is your least favorite part of your body?

For my least favorite, the moles on my body.

4. When did you first discover that you had stretch marks?

After I had my third child. I thought, “WOW! My body really has had to work hard!”

5. What is your favorite part of your body?

I would say my eyes.

6. Did you feel like you were not as beautiful when you noticed them?

No, I felt like they were proof of me being a mother. And I love being a mother. 

7. What is one quality you wished shined brighter than your exterior appearance?

I would say, getting to the heart of who I am as a person - beyond just a work colleague. I am more than my work. I have a lot of parts to me.  I think also my artistic creativity. It used to shine brightly, and it doesn’t shine as brightly now.  I felt like I was the most creative in my life as a film editor. Less so as a mom, and less so as a teacher.

8. Growing up in a household of females, what did you learn about self love? 

I was raised in an affluent environment where people were very aware of their body image.  I was fortunate in that I was confident with my body, although I was very small chested. So that was something I was wishing I had more of.  Everybody has parts of their body’s that they don’t love. I realized that early on.  Somehow, you have to get past that because everybody’s bodies are unique and beautiful.  My sisters, mom and I always supported each other and positively reenforced each other’s body image. I think any negative influence I would have had came from outside of my family.

9. How has your perception of stretch marks changed?

I think as my children have gotten older, I really appreciate my stretch marks more.  I really did, and still do, love being a mother. So I look at my stretch marks fondly - I don’t look at them as being ugly but instead as being scars of wonderful memories and wonderful time in my life that I would do again if I could.

10. What is one thing you wish would change between women in our society?

I would start with people being more aware of the important of listening to each other. Not always talking over or at each other.  Being a good listener is a good place to start.  And genuinely listening and engaging with what people are saying.  Whether it’s between women or men.  I don’t have real strong conflicts with women anymore. I mean, there can be jealousies and that sort of thing that can form between women who are competitive about their looks. But I am kind of past that. Any work that I do towards looking better as I age is really for me. Not because of anyone.  It’s just me wanting to take care of my body and try to stay as healthy as I can.

11. What is something new you have learned about your body with age?

Well, I hugely appreciate my body and I realize that its constantly working to repair itself. And so as I’ve gotten older, I’ve come to wanting to support my body more. I used to, not hugely, but somewhat neglect my body and not pay attention to all that it does for me all the time.  So as I’ve gotten older I am at a point where I’ve realized to really support my body  - I don’t want to take it for granted. 

12. Do you have any comments about your body acceptance journey?

I think I am really happy to have stretch marks, especially around my chest. I was so small and self conscious as a child about how my chest was. It is kind of cool that my breasts has this special quality to them now.  Especially in this project! 

©2023 by Marcus Berg. Proudly created with wix.com